Tag: west texas

View Video
circle_ranch_keyline

Gulleys for Grassland Restoration #9: Harvesting Water in Steep Canyons

Restoring the Southwest’s desert grasslands takes water. Most ranches treat eroding gulleys and roads – and their stormwater runoffs – as liabilities. In fact these are potential water assets on every ranch. This little diversion dam harvests water from a steep desert canyon and returns it to water-starved meadows, restoring upstream plants and reducing downstream

russian_thistle

Gone With the Wind – Russian Thistle

Thistle is a great rescue plant for desertified ranges. Quail love thistle seeds and the bugs it hosts, and many wild and domestic animals use it when it is young and tender.

tangleweed_west_texas

Tanglehead in South Texas – Changes and Challenges

The so-called “invasion” of Tanglehead grass is a symptom of cattle removals on South Texas rangeland. This excellent article contains insights and facts that point to this. The facts: Tanglehead is a native grass. Tanglehead was not ‘invasive’ so long as the ranges were being grazed. With reduced grazing, it outgrows other native grasses. Stated

View Video

Using an Eroded Gulley to Recreate a Wet Meadow

This video, #8, is a companion piece to #3 in the series. It shows how Fred’s Dam works during a rain, how the redirected water has created a seasonal wet meadow, what is happening to the water as it exits the wet meadow, and how that water might be managed as it moves downslope. I

View Video
circle_ranch_texas_fall_flowers_feature

Out Here in the Middle – Summer at Circle Ranch in far-West Texas

“Out Here in The Middle” Is about summer at the Circle Ranch in the high-desert mountains of far-West Texas. Wildlife, great scenery, ranching, cattle and family. “Out Here in The Middle” is performed by James McMurtry. Note: This was originally posted on the Circle Ranch blog summer 2015.

View Video

Drought Busters 101

“Drought Busters” is an inexpensive, quick, physiologically and economically sustainable method of habitat and wildlife restoration. We call it Drought Busters because it increases effective rainfall by rebuilding soil fertility and the soil’s ability to absorb and store water. This video explains Drought Busters, and our experience on how wild and domestic animals, Keyline sub-soiling,

View Video
circle_ranch_west_texas_rain_feature

Chupacabra Nesting Area National Wildlife Refuge

San Antonio artist Gary Sweeney’s take on the legendary creature of Northern Mexico. Chupacabra Nesting Area National Wildlife Refuge from Christopher Gill on Vimeo. More about artist Gary Sweeney Gary Sweeney’s Nostalgia, Texas from Walley Films on Vimeo.

apache_heights_oil

Oil Trends in Far-West Texas

Mineral revenues can be very good for wildlife practices.

circle_ranch_keyline_1_feature

Best Tools for No-Till Farming

These principals readily apply to ranching. Keeping desert rangeland covered with plants is the rancher’s most important challenge.

circle_ranch_out_here_video_feature

West Texas Mineral Classifications Explained

Much of far-West Texas is ‘mineral classified’. This important feature of land ownership is a major reason why West Texas ranches are such great investments. Enacted in 1919, the Relinquishment Act, as interpreted by the Courts, reserves all minerals to the State in those lands sold with a mineral classification between September 1, 1895 and