Tag: Grazing

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Allan Savory: Planned Cattle Grazing Where the Rubber Hits the Road

In this 45-minute video, the Dean of holistic range science – Allan Savory – discusses on-the-ground application of holistic planned grazing. West Texas and New Mexico ranchers will find many helpful insights, observations and suggestions in this wide-ranging discussion of range and wildlife practices.

Desert Mule Deer “Management”: Does Culling Low-Point Desert Mule Deer Bucks Help or Harm the Herd and Its Genetics?

Culling Mule Deer – or whitetail – is scientifically unjustifiable, and does not improve herd genetics. Note: This post originally appeared on this blog in November 2014 Approach #1: Remove Cull Bucks to Improve Herd Genetics …Jerad Wayne Zachary, Deer Guide Dear Mr. Gill, I hope you are doing well. I just wanted to throw in

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Rangeland Restoration: Subsoil Contour Plowing at Circle Ranch, in far-West Texas

Subsoil contour plowing is an excellent way to increase water absorption in the desert grasslands of far-West Texas and Southern New Mexico. The effectiveness of the practice is shown in these before-and-after comparisons.

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly moving cattle herds on rangeland health. Their peer-reviewed findings contradicted the earlier conclusions of other Texas A&M researchers David Briske

Rare Big Bend Grass Added to Federal Endangered Species List

Most agencies, universities and conservationists continue to blame cattle grazing for grassland decline. The biodiversity loss described in this article is real but the blame is misplaced. The real cause of grassland decline is lack of animal impact from periodic grazing of bison or cattle and abundant wild species. The finely balanced system also requires

Ranches for Free: Birdwell Creek – Planned Grazing

  Here is a Texas example of high density planned grazing, which means the owners greatly increased cattle numbers and animal density, improving habitat and forage production. The increase in productivity per acre is like getting a ranch (or two) for free. These results directly contradict the agency-university biases against cattle in general and holistic

Dr. David Briske et al. Synthesis Paper

This paper was published in 2008. Texas A&M range scientist David Briske and several academic colleagues concluded that planned grazing is ineffective and has been disproved as a grazing method, and that low-density set-stocking, which means keeping fewer cattle in one place all the time, is the best grazing method.

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Scant Oversight, Corporate Secrecy Preceded U.S. Weed Killer Crisis

Collusion between regulators and the companies they are supposed to regulate is as pervasive in food production as in every industry where power and control is concentrated in a few hands. 

Trump Picks Susan Combs For Interior Post

A terrific choice for America, for Texas, and, for Western ranchers, wildlife & habitat.

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Iowa State Fair Cow and Boy Taking Nap Wins the Internet After Photo Goes Viral

This touching photo evokes the ancient connection between humans and livestock. Sadly, modern industrial agriculture – including much dairy and meat production – breaks this connection and increasingly disregards humane animal husbandry.