Tag: Cows

allan_savory

This Man Wants You to Eat More Meat

“We’ve had about a hundred years of ‘range science.’ I hate that term because it’s not science, it’s range beliefs that assume scientific proportion. They come up with rotational grazing and other approaches on and

bison_yellowstone

Book Review of American Serengeti: The Last Big Animals of the Great Plains

American Serengeti is Dan Flores’ natural history of the American Great Plains throughout its 13,000-years of human presence. According to the author, the book is the “Big History” of two lost worlds, both of which were

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Turning a Dangerous Arroyo Into a Flood Irrigation Resource in the Deserts of Far-West Texas

Here is how we harvested water out of Circle Ranch’s worst gully, and used it to re-wet 5-miles of desert meadows.

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Rancher Takes an Unconventional Path to Restoring His Land

“Chris Gill, 72,  together with his family own Circle Ranch in far-West Texas. He thinks of the desert habitat, its flora and fauna, as a single system.”

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Emerging Land Use Practices Rapidly Increase Soil Organic Matter

“Emerging land uses, such as management-intensive grazing, may offer a rare win–win strategy combining profitable food production with rapid improvement of soil quality and short-term climate mitigation through soil carbon accumulation (sequestration)”

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Planned Grazing and Deer

“Properly grazed cattle can improve deer health. Cattle herds can replace the big nomadic grazers with which animals and plants evolved. Plants and animals are symbiotic: Plants need animals as much as animals need plants.

Desert Mule Deer “Management”: Does Culling Low-Point Desert Mule Deer Bucks Help or Harm the Herd and Its Genetics?

Culling Mule Deer – or whitetail – is scientifically unjustifiable, and does not improve herd genetics. Note: This post originally appeared on this blog in November 2014 Approach #1: Remove Cull Bucks to Improve Herd Genetics

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly

Ranches for Free: Birdwell Creek – Planned Grazing

  Here is a Texas example of high density planned grazing, which means the owners greatly increased cattle numbers and animal density, improving habitat and forage production. The increase in productivity per acre is like

animal_crossing_highway_montana

Wildlife Crossings Get a Whole New Look

These structures can satisfy wildlife’s need to move across our Western ranges. They can also facilitate grazing.  Both are needed for habitat restoration and wildlife conservation.