Tag: Continuous Grazing

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Emerging Land Use Practices Rapidly Increase Soil Organic Matter

“Emerging land uses, such as management-intensive grazing, may offer a rare win–win strategy combining profitable food production with rapid improvement of soil quality and short-term climate mitigation through soil carbon accumulation (sequestration)”

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Holistic Planned Grazing on Rangelands: Why the Gap Between Researcher Beliefs and Rancher Experience?

In this paper published in the Journal of Environmental Management, Texas A&M range scientists and their colleagues discuss why—70 years after the development of holistic planned grazing, and notwithstanding the positive experience reported by so many producers who use it—academicians and researchers remain closed to its concepts.  

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Increasing Soil Carbon Helps Restore Wildlife and Habitat

The best and most restorative wildlife practices are those which increase soil fertility. If every wildlife decision were evaluated according to this outcome, wildlife & habitat ‘management’ would fundamentally change. Soil Solutions to Climate Problems – Narrated by Michael Pollan from Center for Food Safety on Vimeo.

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Allan Savory: Planned Cattle Grazing Where the Rubber Hits the Road

In this 45-minute video, the Dean of holistic range science – Allan Savory – discusses on-the-ground application of holistic planned grazing. West Texas and New Mexico ranchers will find many helpful insights, observations and suggestions in this wide-ranging discussion of range and wildlife practices.

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly moving cattle herds on rangeland health. Their peer-reviewed findings contradicted the earlier conclusions of other Texas A&M researchers David Briske

Ranches for Free: Birdwell Creek – Planned Grazing

  Here is a Texas example of high density planned grazing, which means the owners greatly increased cattle numbers and animal density, improving habitat and forage production. The increase in productivity per acre is like getting a ranch (or two) for free. These results directly contradict the agency-university biases against cattle in general and holistic

Dr. David Briske et al. Synthesis Paper

This paper was published in 2008. Texas A&M range scientist David Briske and several academic colleagues concluded that planned grazing is ineffective and has been disproved as a grazing method, and that low-density set-stocking, which means keeping fewer cattle in one place all the time, is the best grazing method.

Allan Savory: How to Green the World’s Deserts and Reverse Climate Change

Desertification is a fancy word for land that is turning to desert,” begins Allan Savory in this quietly powerful talk (now viewed by 4-million). And terrifyingly, it’s happening to about two-thirds of the world’s grasslands, accelerating climate change and causing traditional grazing societies to descend into social chaos. Savory has devoted his life to stopping

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Tanglehead in South Texas – Changes and Challenges

The so-called “invasion” of Tanglehead grass is a symptom of cattle removals on South Texas rangeland. This excellent article contains insights and facts that point to this. The facts: Tanglehead is a native grass. Tanglehead was not ‘invasive’ so long as the ranges were being grazed. With reduced grazing, it outgrows other native grasses. Stated

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Grazing to Promote Riparian Health on a Private Ranch in Nevada

On this Nevada ranch, cattle numbers were tripled under planned grazing, with transformational results.